Weka Pass Railway

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Weka Pass Railway
NZR A class No. 428 at Frog Rock on the Weka Pass Railway.jpg
A 428 just leaving Frog Rock cutting.
LocaleWaipara, New Zealand
TerminusGlenmark Station and Waikari Station
Coordinates43°03′16″S 172°45′28″E / 43.0544°S 172.7579°E / -43.0544; 172.7579Coordinates: 43°03′16″S 172°45′28″E / 43.0544°S 172.7579°E / -43.0544; 172.7579
ConnectionsKiwiRail Main North Line
Commercial operations
NameWaiau Branchline
Built byNew Zealand Government Railways
Original gauge1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in)
Preserved operations
Owned byWeka Pass Railway Society
Operated byWeka Pass Railway Society
StationsTwo
Length12.8 km (8.0 mi)
Preserved gauge1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in)
Commercial history
Opened15 December 1919
Closed15 January 1978
Preservation history
1982Formation of Society
1984First Operation of Trains
1993Recommissioning of A 428
1995Inaugural Waipara Vintage Festival
1999Official opening of the railway
2003Opening of the Waikari turntable
2009Opening of the Glenmark turntable
Website
www.wekapassrailway.co.nz

The Weka Pass Railway is a New Zealand heritage railway based in Waipara, North Canterbury. It is operated on a 12.8 km length of the former Waiau Branch railway between Waipara and Waikari. The railway is operated by an incorporated society whose members come from all walks of life and are largely resident in the city of Christchurch, 60 km to the south. The railway began carrying passengers in 1984 and is now well established locally and nationally.[1]

History[edit]

Beginnings[edit]

The first stage of the Waiau Branch line inland through the Weka Pass to Waikari was completed in 1882. This area is noted for its scenery and the railway passes through many large cuttings, around tight curves and on steep gradients (max 1 in 47). When originally built the line was expected to be part of the South Island Main Trunk Railway north of the city of Christchurch. Further sections of the line through Hawarden, Medbury, Balmoral, Pahau, Culverden, Achray, Rotherham and Waiau were constructed in subsequent years. The line was officially opened to Medbury in 1884 and to Culverden in 1886 but the final section to Waiau was not completed until 1919. In the 1920s the decision was made to take the Main North Line on a coastal route north out of Waipara. The Main North Line, which involved major earthworks and many engineering difficulties, was not completed until 1945.[1]

Weka Pass Railway Station, Waikari, New Zealand

The Waiau Branch suffered the fate of many rural branch lines in later years as increasing competition from road transport saw a decline in traffic carried. For many years the railways were protected from this competition by mileage limits; as these were gradually increased, more and more branches were closed. The branch had a short reprieve in its twilight years when large amounts of logs were carried from the Balmoral forest. Closure occurred on 15 January 1978.[1]

Formation[edit]

A public meeting at Waipara in August 1982 saw a steering committee established to investigate the Weka Pass Railway proposal. There had been interest from a number of people in preserving part of this old branch line particularly in the scenic Weka Pass.[1] The impetus came from local Waipara people who saw the tourist potential, and railway enthusiasts, many drawn from the Ferrymead Railway. The Society was formally established in November that year.[1] The new group began negotiating with NZ Railways and other parties to purchase track, locomotives, rolling stock and other facilities. In May 1983, the first major public event was held. The "Mayfair Festival" was held and featured the Canterbury Railway Societys Manning Wardle No. 1841 of 1914, and Fowler No. 16246 of 1924 from the Canterbury Steam Preservation Society, along with rakes of LA and LC "high-side" wagons, full of passengers. Shuttles ran from the old Waipara yard to the 3 km straight.[1]

In July 1983, the railway agreed with the New Zealand Railways Corporation to lease the line between Waipara and the south bank of the Hurunui River.[1] Public running commenced on 4 June 1984, and travelled from McCaskeys Crossing to Herberts Crossing (and stopped for picnics at Frog Rock along the way). The WPR purchased the leased section of the line on 3 September 1984, and the final payment was made on 28 August 1990. On 30 September 1984, running on the line ceased due to legal complications about the transfer of the ownership.[1] The railway was later granted permission to operate trains on under their own name on the line, a public running recommenced on 17 March 1985.[1]

Following the closure the Waiau line, all of the track remained in place except for the removal of a level crossing at Waikari where the road crossed State Highway 7 due to Transit New Zealand and the National Roads Board refusing for the crossing to be reinstalled.[1] Because of this, in September 1988 the WPR agreed to lift the line between Waikari and the south bank of the Hurunui River, and section was finally lifted by July 1991.[1]

Track and turntables[edit]

Track[edit]

The Weka Pass Railway operates 12.8 km of the former Waiau Branchline between Waipara and its terminus at Waikari.[1]

Not long after trains commenced running to Waikari, the railway suffered a major setback in 1986 when heavy rain damaged the line in a number of places. During this time, it was decided that the line wasn't in good condition, and it would need extensive repairs, and earthworks in some portion of line.[1] By April 1987 trains were running to the 5.5 km peg.[1] Due to a slump near Antils Hut found in September 1987, trains were once again restricted.[1] After repairs were made, trains recommenced running to the area on 28 January 1988.[1] During this time, the section of track between the old Waipara yard and Glenmark Station were realigned.[1] In the same year, work started in Waikari with the ripping up of track.

On 3 June 1990, trains started operating to Gate No. 2. Trains then started operating to Frog Rock in June 1991, and to Herberts Crossing on 23 August 1992. The line later reached Timpendean, but due to the lack of a suitable picnic area, trains were only allowed to run to Herberts Crossing.[1] On 11 September 1999 was marked as a historic day for the WPR, as it was the day for opening of the line to Waikari, and also the official opening day of the WPR.[1] A "members train" was hauled by DGs 770 and 791 and travelled all the way to Waikari, and after dropping the members off at the platform, the train was propelled back, where the DGs were placed into the turntable road, and F 163 sat in the loop with the "members train".[2] A "special guest train", which was hauled by A 428, followed soon after. WD 357 sat at the end of the line at the stop block.[2] In 2001, a new turn-out was installed in the yard in Waipara.[3]

Turntables[edit]

The railway has a turntable at both Glenmark and Waikari. A 55-foot turntable was installed in Waikari on 3 October 2002,[4] and was recommissioned on 31 August 2003. A special train ran from Christchurch hauled by DCP 4761, as well as another train, which was hauled by A 428 and composed of the railway's own carriages. The turntable was found in a scrap heap in Middleton Yard (in Christchurch), and was purchased by the railway in the mid-1990s.[5] A 62-foot turntable was installed in Glenmark (Waipara). It took 14 months for the turntable to be restored and installed, and was reopened on 12 July 2009.[6] There were issues with the installation with the turntable, as the land was privately owned at the time.[7] This now enables the locomotives to be turned to face the correct way, instead of running tender-leading on the return journey to Glenmark from Waikari. In 2010, the railway won the "KiwiRail Network Infrastructure Improvement Undertaken by a Heritage Railway award" for the restorations of the two turntables.[8]

Buildings[edit]

Stations[edit]

Glenmark Station[edit]

Glenmark Station in Waipara

The ex-Mina Railway Station was built in 1910, and served many passenger trains along the Main North Line, and had been extensively refurbished. By 1979, a new concrete front was needed to support the platform. In October 1980, the railway station became an unattended flag station, and was closed to all traffic.[1] A private resident and his family, who was living in Cheviot at the time, raised funds and made generous donations to preserve and transport the station to Waipara. In 1986 disassemble of the station commenced, and the station arrived in its current site in 1987.[1] The building was shifted in two sections, and after rejoining the two sections, a new roof was constructed, and new foundations made. A verandah was also fitted, and the station has been in use since April 1988.[1] To avoid confusion, the station was renamed as Glenmark Station, to avoid confusion of the current Waipara Station on the Main North Line.[1]

Waikari Station[edit]

The ex-Hundalee Station was built in 1939, and is a standard class A station (which were designed by George Troup).[9] The station also served many passenger trains along the Main North Line. The building was purchased by the WPR, and was transported to Waikari on 29 October 1991.[1] By July 1992, the station was fully restored, and served its first train in Waikari on 11 September 1999.[1]

In 1995, the railway received an award from the Rail Heritage Trust of New Zealand for the restoration of the two stations.[1]

Locomotive depot and workshop[edit]

In the mid 1980s, a two-road workshop was built in the old Waipara rail yard. The depot was later extended to a three-road depot in 2005, and a pit was installed.[10]

Carriage Shed[edit]

Between 2005 and 2006, a two-road carriage shed was built, and was fitted with roller doors. It houses the WPRs carriage fleet, Wickham Track Inspection Car and one or both DGs. During mid-2012, the shed was fitted with four swinging doors.[11]

Gate Huts[edit]

Because of the railway running through private farmland, Gate Keepers are assigned to Gates No. 1 and 2. Because of this, a hut is allocated to both gates.

During the mid to late 1980s, phone-booth huts were built. But because of the small size of them, the ex-pump-house from the former Kaiapoi rail yard was transported to Gate No. 1, and the ex-Hawarden Gangers hut was transported to Gate No. 2, to replace the phone-booth like-huts. On 8 July 2004, two new brand new huts (which were built in the WPRs yard in Waipara) replaced the second-hand huts (which have since been demolished). The new huts have been named after two late members respectfully.[10]

Operations and membership[edit]

The Railway is fully operated by volunteers. These volunteers come from all walks of life and have diverse and varied interests within the railway. Trackwork enthusiasts can lead a hand on a Wednesday work train, however the majority of work occurs on Saturdays where activities range from shunting movements to engineering. Complimentary training is offered in both correspondence form, and through one-on-one and group lecturing. No fees occur (except for the issue of steam locomotive firemans and drivers certificate, assessed by an external examiner) for these services.

On Running days, the following positions are available:

Train Control[edit]

On the Weka Pass Railway, Tablet Control and Track Authority Control is used to ensure safety of trains between the Glenmark and Waikari station limits. The Train Control Officer (TCO) is responsible for issuing track authorities and for ensuring safe movements on the single line. They communicate with train operating staff members, including train drivers, gate keepers and the Waikari stationmaster in person and via radio.

Waikari Stationmaster[edit]

The Waikari Stationmaster is responsible for driving the track inspection vehicle from Glenmark station to Waikari station at the start of a running day. Upon arrival at Waikari, they sell tickets to any passengers, give clearance to trains to enter Waikari station limits, and assist with shunting manoeuvres. At the end of a running day, they drive the track inspection vehicle from Waikari back to Glenmark.

Guard[edit]

The Guard is responsible for the running of trains. Their duties include but are not limited to carrying out terminal/intermediate brake tests, clipping passenger tickets, and managing crowds during photo-runs. They are also able to engage in conversation with passengers, or simply enjoy the views from the guards van or AT viewing cars. Above all, they are responsible for the safe running of each train service.

Assistant Guard(s)[edit]

Assistant Guards assist the Guard in completing their duties. Usually, the guard will assign them to either collect tickets or perform a passenger headcount, while the guard will perform the remaining task.

Locomotive Driver[edit]

The Locomotive Drivers duty is to prepare and manoeuvre the locomotive. They are responsible for ensuring that all necessary steps are taken in the preparation of the locomotive and are in charge of operating the locomotive. As the line is steeply graded, they must be very careful to ensure that the locomotive's wheels do not slip, and must ensure that the fireman has maintained sufficient water level in the boiler before cresting gradients, in order to prevent crown sheet damage and fusible plug fusion. Sustainable braking must also be performed when travelling down grades.

Locomotive Assistant/Fireman[edit]

The Locomotive Assistant/Fireman's duty is to assist the driver with the safe and efficient operation of the locomotive. The fireman performs controlled firing to raise sufficient steam pressure for the drivers usage on a steam locomotive. The fireman is also responsible for maintaining sufficient water level in the boiler and performing shunting where required. The Locomotive Assistant on a diesel locomotive can be thought of as a first officer, assisting the driver and watching the road ahead, as well as performing shunting where required. As firemen and locomotive assistants gain experience, drivers will begin teaching them to drive the locomotive.

Locomotive Trainee[edit]

They ride with the engine crews in the cab and are able to practice firing techniques, often on the afternoon train on a standard running day. Qualified Firemen/Locomotive Assistants and Drivers supervise these members and give tips and advice to assist the trainee. The trainees are also trained to prepare appliances such as the Detroit Lubricator and the Westinghouse Brake Pumps.

PPA[edit]

During times of high demand, PPA (Preparing and Putting Away) assistants are rostered to help out with operations. A PPA assistant usually has the skill and experience level of a locomotive trainee. They are rostered to allow duties to be completed faster, allowing loco crew shifts to be completed within 10 hours.

Gate Keeper[edit]

Gate No. 2 on the Weka Pass Railway

When the Weka Pass Railway society was formed, much of the original railway formation was already divided onto private land. As a result, the modern day railway passes over several farms. Gate Keepers are responsible for ensuring that livestock does not move from paddock to paddock, and they must report to train control if stock are preventing a gate from being open.

Locomotives and rolling stock[edit]

The railway presently owns four locomotives, all formerly owned by the New Zealand Government Railways, and a large fleet of ex-NZR rolling stock.[1]

NZR steam locomotives[edit]

Key: In service In service, Mainline Certified Under overhaul/restoration/repair Stored Static display Scrapped
Original class and number Builder Builders number Year built Year arrived Notes
A 428 A & G Price 31 1909 1983 Purchased by the A 428 Preservation Society in 1973 and leased to the WPR in 1983. Restored in September 1993, 428 has been in active service since, only being withdrawn for necessary repairs when required. The locomotive since has gone to WPR ownership.

NZR diesel locomotives[edit]

Key: In service In service, Mainline Certified Under overhaul/restoration/repair Stored Static display Scrapped
Original class and number TMS number Builder Builders number Year built Year arrived Notes
DE 512 DE 1429 English Electric 1750 1951 2015 This locomotive is owned by the Diesel Traction Group, and on long-term loan to the WPR for work trains and general shunting duties.
DG 770 DG 2232 English Electric 2274/D353 1955 1983 DG 770 was purchased by the WPR in 1983. This locomotive is operational, and is used on passenger services.
DG 791 DG 2468 English Electric 2295/D374 1955 1983 DG 791 was purchased by the WPR in 1983. This locomotive is operational, and is used on passenger services.
DSA 276 DSA 822 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries 1471 1967 1992 DSA 276 was owned by Rail Base Systems and leased to the WPR in 1992 until being subsequently purchased. The locomotive is undergoing an engine overhaul

Carriages[edit]

Key: In service In service, Mainline Certified Under overhaul/restoration/repair Stored Static display Scrapped
Original class and number TMS number Builder Type Year built Year arrived Notes
A 523 NZR Addington Workshops 43' 9" wooden body passenger carriage 1896 1986 Purchased from the West Coast Historical and Mechanical Society at Shantytown.[12] Used as a bunkhouse for members. It is the oldest piece of rolling stock held by the railway.[13]
A 1720 A 50084
XPC 588
NZR Addington Workshops 50' 0" steel-panelled mainline coach 1931 2020 Purchased from Dunedin Railways in November 2019.
A 1730 A 50132 NZR Addington Workshops 50' 0" steel-panelled suburban carriage 1931 1983 Ex-Dunedin suburban services.[14] Overhauled from 2012 to 2018.[13][15]
A 1731 A 50140 NZR Addington Workshops 50' 0" steel-panelled mainline coach 1931 1983 Ex-Dunedin suburban services. Overhauled from 2004 to 2011.[13] Entered service on 1 May 2011.[16] In 2012, it won the "FRONZ Passenger Carriage Restoration Award".[17][14]
A 1732 A 50159 NZR Addington Workshops 50' 0" steel-panelled suburban carriage 1931 2009 Ex-Dunedin suburban services.[14] Purchased from the Otago Excursion Train Trust.[13] Stored, awaiting restoration.[18][19]
A 1733 A 50167 NZR Addington Workshops 50' 0" steel-panelled suburban carriage 1931 1983 Ex-Dunedin suburban services.[14] Now undergoing overhaul.
A 1760 A 50223 NZR Addington Workshops 50' 0" steel-panelled suburban carriage 1932 2008 Ex-Dunedin suburban services.[13] Purchased from the Otago Excursion Train Trust. Stored, awaiting restoration.[14]
AL 1697 AL 50026 NZR Addington Workshops 50' 0" steel-panelled suburban carriage 1930 1983 Ex-Dunedin suburban services. Rebuilt as a car-van in October 1969.[20] Restored from 1990 - 1993.[13] Underwent repairs and a tidy-up from December 2017 to March 2019.
A 1935 A 3338

AC 3548

NZR Addington Workshops 56' 0" steel-panelled mainline carriage 1939 2001 Currently in storage

Viewing cars[edit]

Key: In service In service, Mainline Certified Under overhaul/restoration/repair Stored Static display Scrapped
Original class and number TMS number Builder Type Year built Year arrived Notes
T 155 T 385 NZR Addington Workshops 32' 6" wooden covered viewing car c1960 1981 Formerly a cattle wagon.[21] Modified as a covered viewing car and reclassified as AT 155 in 1988.[1]
T 157 T 409 NZR Addington Workshops 32' 6" wooden open viewing car c1960 1984 Formerly a cattle wagon.[1] It was renumbered as T 385 circa 1978, and withdrawn on 7 November 1981 in Waipara.[22] Modified as an un-covered viewing car and reclassified as AT 157 in September 1993.[13]

Vans[edit]

Key: In service In service, Mainline Certified Under overhaul/restoration/repair Stored Static display Scrapped
Original class and number TMS number Builder Type Year built Year arrived Notes
F 497 F 962 NZR Hillside Workshops 47' 6" wooden body brake van 1927 1985 Arrived in April 1985 after being donated by a member.[13][12] It was restored from 1997–1998.[23]
F 699 F 2854 NZR Addington Workshops 37' 6" wooden body brake van 1964 1987 Sold in April 1987. F 699 was restored in 1994,[24] and is one of the last wooden vans built by the NZR.[13]

Wagons[edit]

Key: In service In service, Mainline Certified Under overhaul/restoration Stored Static display Scrapped
Original class and number TMS number Type Builder Year built Year arrived Notes
E 2882 E 1344 Four-wheel steel open high sided wagon NZR Hillside Workshops 1908 1983 Originally built as LA 8337.[25][26][27] Stored, awaiting restoration.[28]
EA 1664 EA 65 50-foot Covered wooded bogie wagon NZR Addington Workshops 1935 1987 Originally built as Z 262.[29][30][28] Modified with a mess room and a tool storage room in early 1987. Refurbished and re-roofed in 2014.[27] Used on work trains to transport the track gang to work sites along the line.
EUB 4164 EA 2662 Bogie crane support wagon NZR Addington Workshops 1926 1989 Originally entered service as UB 818.[31][30] Crane support and runner wagon for Diesel Crane NO.197.[27]
H 1557 H 1125 Four wheel cattle wagon Hurst Nelson (assembled at Addington Workshops) 1959 1981 Restored in 1998,[27] and officially recommissioned in April 2000.[32]
JC 4971 JC 487 4 wheel sheep wagon NZR Addington Workshops c1952 1989 Formerly preserved by the now-defunct Southern Rail Group at Prebbleton.[28] Restored in 1999,[23] and officially recommissioned in April 2000.[27][32]
Unidentified KP Unidentified KP 4 Wheel Box Wagon Mitsubishi Heavy Industries N/A 1991 Sold to the railway in May 1991 and used as a storage shed without wheels.[1]
KS 4556 KS 12345 4-wheel steel covered wagon NZR Addington Workshops 1970 2000 Owned by the Rail Heritage Trust.[21] Currently incorrectly stenciled KS 1235.[27]
KS 4479 KS 11507

KST 5069

4-wheel curtain sided wagon NZR Otahuhu Workshops 1970 2000 Owned by the Rail Heritage Trust.[21][27]
LA 20341 4-wheel open high-sider NZR Otahuhu Workshops 1941 c1995 Stored, awaiting restoration.[28]
LA 21338 LA 39170 4-wheel open high-sider NZR Addington Workshops c1950 1986
LC 25542 LC 1588 4-wheel steel open high side wagon NZR Otahuhu Workshops 1950 1990
LPA 1193 LPA 2730 4-wheel steel high side paper wagon Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (assembled at Otahuhu Workshops) 1973 2001 Owned by the Rail Heritage Trust.[27][21]
MC 2386 MC 4830 4 wheel wooden open low side wagon NZR Addington Workshops 1959 1987 Overhauled in 1999,[23] and received a tidy-up from May to July 2018.
NK 385 4-wheel steel flat-top wagon NZR Hillside Workshops 1985 2000 Owned by the Rail Heritage Trust.[21][27]
T 168 T 492 Bogie cattle wagon NZR Hillside Workshops 1960 1984 Stored body-less, awaiting restoration.[21][27]
UB 618 UB 228 Bogie steel flat deck wagon NZR Newmarket Workshops 1908 1983 Oldest freight wagon owned by the Weka Pass Railway.[33]
UC 860 UC 594 Bogie tank wagon NZR Addington Workshops 1930 2000 Owned by the Rail Heritage Trust.[33] Stored awaiting restoration.[21]
UC 1232 UC 1472 Bogie tank wagon NZR Addington Workshops 1947 2001 Owned by the Rail Heritage Trust.[33]
UD 1504 UD 61

EWW 46

Bogie Works and Way Well wagon NZR Otahuhu Workshops 1952 2000 Owned by the Rail Heritage Trust.[21] Used on KiwiRail work trains if required.[33]
UR 2275 URT 304 Steel flat deck bogie log wagon NZR Addington Workshops 1965 1989 Used on work trains.[34]
VR 137 VR 1399 Bogie Steel Insulated wagon Kinki Sharyo Co. (assembled at Otahuhu Workshops) 1964 1983
XP 3226 XP 2754 4-Wheel Ventilated Box Wagon NZR East Town Workshops 1967 1983 Restored in 1999,[35][23] and officially recommissioned in April 2000.[32]
YB 578 YB 1247 4-wheel ballast wagon NZR Hillside Workshops 1942 N/A
YB 621 YB 1656 4-wheel ballast wagon NZR Hillside Workshops 1942 N/A
YB 634 YB 1783 4-wheel ballast wagon NZR Hillside Workshops 1942 N/A
YB 637 YB 1817 4-wheel ballast wagon NZR Hillside Workshops 1942 N/A
YC 838 YC 1716 4-wheel central-discharging ballast wagon NZR Addington Workshops 1960 2007 Owned by the Rail Heritage Trust.[33]
YC 856 YC 1906 4-wheel central-discharging ballast wagon NZR Addington Workshops 1960 2007 Owned by the Rail Heritage Trust.[33] Occasionally used on work trains.
YD 1035 YD 392 Bogie side-dump wagon Differential Car Company c1950 2013 Occasionally used on work trains.
YF 909 YF 132 4-wheel side discharge ballast wagon NZR Addington Workshops 1964 2007 Occasionally used on work trains.
YF 916 YF 201 4-wheel side discharge ballast wagon NZR Addington Workshops 1965 2001 Owned by the Rail Heritage Trust.[21] Incorrectly stenciled YF 203.[33]
Z 356 Z 1032 50-foot Covered wooden bogie wagon NZR Otahuhu Workshops 1946 1989 Under restoration.[36]

Cranes[edit]

Key: In service In service, Mainline Certified Under overhaul/restoration Stored Static display Scrapped
Number TMS class and number Type Lifting capacity Builder Builders number Year built Year arrived Notes
197 EL 1007 Diesel 10 Tonnes Ransomes & Rapier F5637 1943 1989 Entered service in 1943, and was the NZR's first diesel crane. It was not permitted to travel on the Rewanui or Paparoa Inclines.[37] It was renumbered as EL 1007 on 23 July 1979.[37] It was withdrawn in 1989, and arrived at the WPR on 30 May in that year. It was repainted in 2016.
305 Coaling 500 Kilograms N/A N/A 1925 N/A Entered service for the NZR in 1925 as Crane 359.[38] It was purchased by the WPR and restored in 1998, where it was used for coaling A 428.[1] Now currently stored awaiting an overhaul.

Track inspection cars[edit]

Key: In service In service, Mainline Certified Under overhaul/restoration/repair Stored Static display Scrapped
Class Number Builder Builders number Year built Year arrived Notes
WW 5139 Wickham Of Ware 5164 1950 1984 The ex-South Island Wickham Track Inspection Car entered service for the NZR in 1950. It was withdrawn and sold to the WPR in June 1984,[1] and restored by Cooper Hendersons Motors in 1985. In 1995, the interior of the car was refurbished.[1] In 1997, it was given an overhaul of its Austin A40 petrol engine.[39] But the engine was replaced by a Datson 120Y petrol engine in 2002, and also had a new Nissan gear-box fitted.[4] It also received an overhaul of its axles.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag Dew, Leslie (2001). The Great Northern - the story of the Waiau Branch. Weka Pass Railway Inc. ISBN 0-473-07188-6.
  2. ^ a b "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. November 1999.
  3. ^ "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. August 2001.
  4. ^ a b "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. November 2002.
  5. ^ "Railfan". 9 (2). Triple M Publications. March 2003. ISSN 1173-2229.
  6. ^ "Railfan". 16 (1). Triple M Publications. December 2009. ISSN 1173-2229.
  7. ^ "Railfan". 9 (4). Triple M Publications. September 2003. ISSN 1173-2229.
  8. ^ "Railfan". 16 (3). Triple M Publications. June 2010. ISSN 1173-2229.
  9. ^ "Hundalee Station (relocated)". Rail Heritage Trust of New Zealand. Retrieved 3 August 2017.
  10. ^ a b "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. August 2004.
  11. ^ "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. September 2012.
  12. ^ a b "Passenger Cars". New Zealand Rolling Stock Register. Retrieved 30 July 2017.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. December 2014.
  14. ^ a b c d e "Our Carriage Fleet". Weka Pass Railway. Retrieved 10 February 2019.
  15. ^ "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. August 2017.
  16. ^ "Railfan". 17 (3). Triple M Publications. June 2011. ISSN 1173-2229.
  17. ^ "Railfan". 18 (3). Triple M Publications. June 2012. ISSN 1173-2229.
  18. ^ "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. April 2016.
  19. ^ "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. September 2018.
  20. ^ "A". NZ Railways Rolling Stock Lists. Retrieved 30 July 2017.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Goods Wagons". New Zealand Rolling Stock Register. Retrieved 30 July 2017.
  22. ^ "T - Cattle Bogie". NZ Railways Rolling Stock Lists. Retrieved 30 July 2017.
  23. ^ a b c d "Railfan". 5 (3). Triple M Publications. June 1999. ISSN 1173-2229.
  24. ^ "Railfan". 1 (1). Triple M Publications. December 1994. ISSN 1173-2229.
  25. ^ "LA - Highsider of 1902". NZ Railways Rolling Stock Lists. Retrieved 18 July 2018.
  26. ^ "E - Service 4 Wheel". NZ Railways Rolling Stock Lists. Retrieved 31 December 2018.
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. April 2015.
  28. ^ a b c d "Goods Wagons". New Zealand Rolling Stock Register. Retrieved 18 July 2018.
  29. ^ "Z - Covered Bogie of 1894". NZ Railways Rolling Stock Lists. Retrieved 31 December 2018.
  30. ^ a b "EA - Service Bogie". NZ Railways Rolling Stock Lists. Retrieved 31 December 2018.
  31. ^ "UB - Flat Bogie". NZ Railways Rolling Stock Lists. Retrieved 13 August 2017.
  32. ^ a b c "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. March 2000.
  33. ^ a b c d e f g "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. August 2015.
  34. ^ "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. April 2017.
  35. ^ "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. February 1999.
  36. ^ "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. December 2017.
  37. ^ a b "Cranes in NZR Service - Diesel Crane Listing". NZR Cranes. Retrieved 17 August 2017.
  38. ^ "Cranes in NZR Service - Coaling Crane Listing". NZR Cranes. Retrieved 22 August 2017.
  39. ^ "Frog Rock Times". Weka Pass Railway Inc. September 1997.

External links[edit]